Best Bites

This week’s Best Bite: pulled pork, pickles two ways, and moonshine, Lillie’s Q

Fried pickles and kool-aid pickles, Lillie's Q

Pickles two ways: beer-battered with ranch, and marinated in cherry kool-aid

Why it’s this week’s Best Bite: The stakes were a little higher than usual at this recent meal: I was challenged to prove to a skeptical Memphian that there’s good barbecue to be found in Chicago. With my reputation on the line, I had faith that two restaurants in particular would meet the lofty standards of someone who hails from a BBQ capital: Lillie’s Q and Smoque (which will be phase two). After our party secured a window table at Lillie’s, we started with two preparations of pickles. The fried pickles came in substantial beer-battered slices – they almost looked more like fried oysters – alongside a thin ranch dipping sauce. While they were a solid snack, what really earned the seal of Southern authenticity was the jar of fiery red kool-aid pickles, sweet from a cherry kool-aid marinade and spicy on the finish. As conversation turned to tales of childhood nostalgia, I knew we were already on the right track.

Pulled pork and collard greens, Lillie's Q

Half-pound of pulled pork (pre-sauce) and collard greens with ham hock

The real test, of course, was the meat. The half-pound portion of pulled pork was as smoky and perfect on its own as I’d remembered, but I couldn’t resist splashing bites with almost every one of the diverse sauces (it also reminded me to replenish my own fridge, where I consistently stock either the Smoky or Carolina retail varieties). My generous side of greens provided a welcome vinegary contrast, and the potent moonshine cocktails were a fitting libation. I’m proud (and relieved) to report that Lillie’s Q passed the test, so my credibility remains intact.

Moonshine, Lillie's Q

A few variations on moonshine: blueberry, apple pie, and just neat

The details: Lillie’s Q, 1856 W. North Ave., Chicago.

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Best Bites

This week’s Best Bite: Open-faced breakfast burger, Grange Hall Burger Bar

Open-faced breakfast burger, Grange Hall Burger Bar

Open-faced breakfast burger with grass-fed beef burger, cinnamon-raisin french toast, canadian and applewood bacon, maple syrup, sharp cheddar, and sunny-side-up egg

Why it’s this week’s Best Bite: I’ve blogged about my sweet-savory brunch dilemma before, and it remains my most difficult decision on any morning menu. So if there’s a dish that combines both in one, you can bet I’ll be ordering it. Only available on the weekend Farmer’s Breakfast menu, this open-faced burger immediately reminded me of a gourmet, locally sourced, next-level McGriddle (in a good way, of course). It packs three kinds of meat – canadian bacon, applewood bacon, and the grass-fed beef patty – plus cheddar and an chive-flecked egg, all atop a slice of syrup-soaked cinnamon-raisin french toast. While it’s certainly decadent, the portion is still manageable and satisfied every brunch craving at once. The setting is just as pleasant: from the cheery red door flanked by fresh tulips to the farm-themed decor throughout the restaurant, I felt right at home.

Grange Hall Burger Bar entrance

A weathered red door and fresh tulips at the entrance set off the farm décor

The details: Grange Hall Burger Bar, 844 W. Randolph St., Chicago.

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Best Bites

This week’s Best Bite: Chicken & andouille gumbo and Best in Show cocktail, Analogue

Chicken and andouille gumbo, Analogue

Gumbo with Gunthorp chicken, house andouille, and potato salad

Why it’s this week’s Best Bite: Analogue, a fairly new addition to my neighborhood, has introduced me to a combination I never knew my life was missing until now: craft cocktails paired with authentic Cajun food (in other words, just one more reason to love living in Logan Square). On the cocktail side, the Best in Show had the citrusy tang and foamy egg white crown of a Pisco sour, plus a heavy dose of cinnamon. It had sweetness and complexity that made it exciting to drink – although that probably was to be expected from the Violet Hour veterans who are behind the drinks here. Meanwhile, the standout dish was a Cajun classic: gumbo with tender chicken, house-made andouille sausage, okra, and a small dollop of potato salad, which I later learned was the result of German influence on Creole traditions. The moderate heat and blackened, smoky base notes in the meaty broth were what really kept me going back for more spoonfuls.

Best in Show cocktail, Analogue

Best in Show cocktail with Encanto Grand & Noble Pisco, cream sherry, lime, cinnamon syrup, and egg white

The details: Analogue, 2523 N. Milwaukee Ave., Chicago.

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Best Bites

This week’s Best Bite: Soft-scrambled eggs, salmon tartare & grilled mushrooms, Kinmont

Soft-scrambled eggs, Kinmont

Soft-scrambled eggs with smoked Lake Superior whitefish, salmon roe, chives, and country bread

Why it’s this week’s Best Bite: I was excited to try Kinmont, a new seafood place that recently opened just blocks from my office, and certainly support the restaurant’s commitment to serving entirely sustainable fish. I’d already heard great things about the soft-scrambled eggs; and sure enough, the eggs’ texture was creamy and light without being runny, perfect for spreading on the thick country bread. The eggs were also studded with both smoked whitefish and salmon roe, a double-punch of seafood flavor. Another favorite, the Skuna bay salmon tartare, covered a more Nordic flavor profile: fresh fish intermingled with mustard, cornichon, egg, and lots of dill. The tartare was served with sturdy, herbaceous flatbread that had great crunch.

Salmon tartare, Kinmont

Skuna Bay salmon tartare with cornichons, shallots, mustard, and crisp bread

We also wanted to try one of the vegetable sides, and were immediately intrigued by the pairing of grilled mushrooms and smoked ricotta. The char from the grill and the smoky, rich ricotta played off each other to give the woody mushrooms surprising depth, and a generous shower of lemon zest added brightness.

Mushrooms, Kinmont

Grilled mushrooms with smoked buttermilk ricotta and lemon

The details: Kinmont, 419 W. Superior, Chicago.

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Best Bites

This week’s Best Bite: Belly dog with togarashi fries, Belly Shack

Belly dog with togarashi fries, Belly Shack

Belly dog, an all-beef hot dog with with egg noodles, pickled green papaya, and togarashi-spiced fries

Why it’s this week’s Best Bite: I was a little shocked to realize that I haven’t blogged about Belly Shack yet, since it’s one of my very favorite places to eat and a go-to recommendation for pretty much anyone. It’s a casual, inexpensive BYOB spot right underneath the Blue Line with a menu that’s the perfect fusion of Latin and Asian (Chef Bill Kim is Korean, and wife and co-owner Yvonne is Puerto Rican). I’m also going to admit that even in such a hot dog-obsessed town, this off-the-wall Belly dog might be tops in my book. Piled high with egg noodles, fried shallots, pickled papaya, and a smear of curry mayo, the dog is a messy affair, even despite its sturdy roll. But the spicy, creamy, crunchy tangle of flavors is well worth it. And I don’t know what it is about the togarashi seasoning that’s both on the fries and in the extra curry mayo dipping sauce, but it is absolutely addictive. It’s salty and funky, and works wonderfully with heaps of lime zest to take the crispy fries to a whole new level.

The details: Belly Shack, 1912 N. Western Ave., Chicago.

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Travel Eats

Travel Eats: A whirlwind weekend in Philly

Travel Eats documents my food adventures outside of Chicago.

Philly cheese steak with onions and Cheez Whiz, Pat's

Philly cheese steak with onions and Cheez Whiz, Pat’s

I spent 48 hours in Philadelphia for the bachelorette party of a dear friend I’ve known since preschool who now lives there. Our group managed to fit in a surprisingly wide range of cuisine in a short amount of time – starting, of course, with a classic Philly cheese steak. Two of the most famous steak places sit right across the street from each other in South Philly: Pat’s King of Steaks and Geno’s Steaks. We went with Pat’s, and it was a quintessential no-nonsense sandwich joint. I ordered my steak “wit” (with onions), and with neon-yellow Cheez Whiz (seemingly the most popular option). It was drier than I expected, although I guess I’m just used to Italian beef, and did truly showcase meat, cheese, and bread in their purest, no-frills form. I also added a few of the house peppers and hot sauce, but only to one side, as they did overpower the steak a bit. We also stopped nearby for gelati from Rita’s, a treat that I’d remembered from a summer on the Jersey Shore. It was half mango Italian ice and half vanilla custard, which gave it a well-balanced Creamsicle effect.

Mango gelati, Rita's

Mango gelati with Italian ice and frozen custard, Rita’s

For brunch, it was The Dandelion, a British pub-style eatery filled with charming details. A citrusy pitcher of Pimm’s cup was an exceedingly refreshing way to start – it should really be offered on more brunch cocktail menus. I really loved my poached eggs with bubbles and squeak, a traditional hash from across the pond that’s made with veggies, cabbage, and potatoes. What really made the dish was the housemade steak sauce, basically a thicker version of worcestershire sauce that made the eggs and hash incredibly savory. We also shared the scotch pancakes, which hit all the right maple-apple-cinnamon notes.

Poached eggs with bubble & squeak, plus hollandaise and housemade steak sauce, The Dandelion

Poached eggs with bubble & squeak, plus hollandaise and housemade steak sauce, The Dandelion

Pitcher of Pimm's cup as a brunch cocktail at The Dandelion

Pitcher of Pimm’s cup with cucumber, orange, lemon, and strawberry as a brunch cocktail at The Dandelion

Scotch pancakes with maple apples and cinnamon cream, The Dandelion

Scotch pancakes with maple apples and cinnamon cream, The Dandelion

The Dandelion's charming exterior

The Dandelion’s charming exterior

We spent one evening in Chinatown, first noshing on creative sushi and okonomiyaki (seafood pancake) at Yakitori Boy. When we finished, instead of venturing upstairs to the two floors of karaoke that were already in high demand, we rounded the corner to what was our most intriguing destination. A buzzed-about speakeasy called Hop Sing Laundromat lies hidden behind an unmarked door that’s guarded by a man that I later learned was known as Lee. He asked us what we were there for and who had told us about the place (we may or may not have name-dropped a certain celebrity chef), and finally made it in inside. Lee launched into the house rules: primarily, no photos or videos of any kind, and no phone calls except in the lobby area; if any rule was broken, we’d be kicked out immediately. By the time he was done with his spiel, we were sufficiently terrified to disobey him, and were ready for our table. The space was rich and cozy, and I took it in all the more knowing that it couldn’t be documented. I also had one of the most interesting cocktails I’ve ever had: the Montana Payback, with applejack brandy, rum, velvet falernum, lime juice, muddled strawberries, Thai chili, and cream, topped with rose petals. It was fruit-forward and complex, and the chili left my lips tingling. This place is absolutely worth a visit if you’re ever in the area.

Secret door to Hop Sing Laundromat speakeasy (shhhh!)

Proprietor Lee standing behind the secret door to Hop Sing Laundromat speakeasy (shhhh!)

Sushi rolls, Yakitori Boy

Sushi rolls, Yakitori Boy

Our other big meal was at Philly’s popular Oyster House. We’d called in advance to partake in the Dump Dinner, a clam bake-esque feast of Maine lobster (a half-lobster per person), steamed clams, mussels, merguez sausage, kale, and new potatoes, all in a pot, plus fries and slaw on the side. With pages from the Sunday New York Times covering the table and lobster bibs around our necks, we dug in for a messy, but completely delicious seafood extravaganza. While it’s tough to beat dunking lobster claw meat into melted butter, I also appreciated the contrast of the wilted kale and merguez sausage that had soaked up all the shellfish liquid.

Dump Dinner place setting, complete with lobster bib, at Oyster House

Dump Dinner place setting, complete with lobster bib, at Oyster House

Clambake–style "Dump Dinner"  with steamed clams, mussels, Maine lobsters, merguez sausage, kale, potatoes, fries, and slaw

“Dump Dinner” with steamed clams, mussels, Maine lobsters, merguez sausage, kale, potatoes, fries, and slaw

The details: Pat’s, 1237 E. Passyunk Ave.; Rita’s, 239 South St.; Yakitori Boy, 211 N. 11th St.; Hop Sing Laundromat, 1029 Race St.; The Dandelion, 124 S. 18th St.; Oyster House, 1516 Sansom St. (all Philadelphia).

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Travel Eats

Travel Eats: Best sweet bites from 4 days in NYC

Travel Eats documents my food adventures outside of Chicago.

Black & white cookies, Lenny's

Black & white cookies, Lenny’s

No trip to New York is complete without indulging my sweet tooth. I couldn’t even make it 12 hours before I snatched up a jumbo black and white cookie from Lenny’s. This particular cookie was my vice when I lived there, and is the standard to which I compare all other black and white cookies (I try them pretty much whenever I can find them in Chicago or when I’m traveling). No other has ever measured up. The base is golden and spongy, with a thick coating of vanilla and chocolate glaze – the most prized bites are the ones down the middle that contain some of each glaze.

Dark chocolate peanut butter chip cookie, Levain Bakery

Dark chocolate peanut butter chip cookie, Levain Bakery

Where the famous chocolate chip cookies are baked

Where the famous chocolate chip cookies are baked

NYC is also home to another gold cookie standard: the 6-ounce chocolate-chip behemoths at the famous Levain Bakery on the Upper West Side. These cookies are completely bonkers: they’re dense mega-cookie masses that are somehow able to stay gooey on the inside and crisp on the outside long after they’re fresh from the oven. I’m partial to the chocolate-peanut butter variety, but you can’t go wrong with any of them. I brought home two of these cookies for my roommate, who had already experienced their greatness on past trips, and she reacted as if I had given her a winning lottery ticket.

We found one more standout cookie at the Jacques Torres in Rockefeller Center. I already knew we were onto something when the cashier asked if we wanted it served warm, and saw a few of the dark chocolate chip cookies on a heating tray that was kept at the ideal melty temperature. Between the decadent cookie and sips of the rich “wicked” hot chocolate that was spiked with ancho and chipotle, I was teetering on the edge of chocolate overload, but I persevered in the interest of research!

Warm chocolate chip cookie and wicked hot chocolate with ancho and chipotle

Warm chocolate chip cookie and wicked hot chocolate with ancho and chipotle

And dessert didn’t stop at cookies. Other favorite treats included Doughnut Plant’s passionfruit-glazed yeast doughnut, which had a distinct and unique fruitiness, and a bite-size PB&J cupcake at SoHo storefront Baked by Melissa, which also won for cutest display case. Finally, the wrap-up to our brunch at The Spotted Pig was a swoon-worthy slice of the restaurant’s signature banoffee pie that layered banana, dulce de leche, tufts of whipped cream, and shaved chocolate atop a thin crust. A sweet ending to the trip, indeed.

Passionfruit glazed yeast doughnut, Doughnut Plant

Passionfruit glazed yeast doughnut, Doughnut Plant

Bite-sized cupcakes, Baked by Melissa

Bite-sized cupcakes, Baked by Melissa

Banoffee pie, The Spotted Pig

Banoffee pie, The Spotted Pig

The details: Lenny’s and Jacques Torres, both 30 Rockefeller Plaza; Levain Bakery, 167 W. 74th St.; The Spotted Pig, 314 W. 11th St.; Doughnut Plant, 220 W. 23rd St.; Baked by Melissa, 577 Broadway.

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Travel Eats

Travel Eats: Best savory bites from 4 days in NYC

Travel Eats documents my food adventures outside of Chicago.

Everything bagel with pastrami-cured salmon and horseradish cream cheese, Russ & Daughters

Everything bagel with pastrami-cured salmon and horseradish cream cheese, Russ & Daughters

While in New York, there was a lot of other eating to do outside of our Restaurant Week reservations. First off, in such a bagel-centric city, breakfast was a high priority. I was especially awestruck by Russ & Daughters, a smoked fish mecca that’s been around for 100 years, but that I hadn’t visited until this trip. The pastrami-cured salmon combined two potent New York flavors into one unforgettable bagel topping, only enhanced by a slick of horseradish cream cheese. I can’t wait to go back and taste more kinds of fish! We also stopped at legendary Katz’s Deli (you may remember it from When Harry Met Sally or Enchanted) – since it was a little too early in the day for a sky-high sandwich, we settled for a simpler snack of latkes with applesauce and sour cream.

Cream cheese and caviar at the Russ & Daughters counter as my bagel is being prepared

Cream cheese and caviar at the Russ & Daughters counter as my bagel is assembled

Smoked fish heaven at Russ & Daughters

Smoked fish heaven at Russ & Daughters

Latkes and coffee, Katz's Delicatessen

Latkes and coffee, Katz’s Delicatessen

Interior at the legendary Katz's deli, including the "When Harry Met Sally" sign

Interior at the legendary Katz’s deli, including the “When Harry Met Sally” sign

In pursuit of pizza, another important New York food group, we ventured out to Roberta’s in Brooklyn. Both pies we tried were sublime, with bubbly, charred crusts and perfectly melted rounds of fresh mozzarella. The duck prosciutto with crusty bread had a nicely subtle richness as a starter. On the other end of the spectrum, I couldn’t resist inducting my friends into the late-night tradition that is 99-cent pizza: a piping hot, classic NY-style slice that might be the best value in Manhattan. It’s served at locations all over the island, and was a staple for my roommates and I when we lived there.

Four Emperors (arrabbiata, mozzarella, ricotta, capra con pepe, asiago, and sesame seed) and Lionheart (tomato, mozzarella, pecorino, prosciutto cotto, brussels sprouts, and onion) pizzas, Roberta's

Four Emperors (arrabbiata, mozzarella, ricotta, capra con pepe, asiago, and sesame seed) and Lionheart (tomato, mozzarella, pecorino, prosciutto cotto, brussels sprouts, and onion) pizzas, Roberta’s

Duck prosciutto with bread, Roberta's

Duck prosciutto with bread, Roberta’s

A late-night slice from one of the many 99-Cent Fresh Pizza locations

A late-night slice from one of the many 99-Cent Fresh Pizza locations

And then there was brunch at The Spotted Pig, Chef April Bloomfield’s ultra-popular West Village gastropub. I went for the sizzling sisig special, traditionally a Filipino dish made with diced-up pig face and an egg added in the middle. It was crispy, porky, garlicky, and a little over-the-top, but so delicious. All I wanted were more bread crisps to dip into what was left in the cast-iron pan. The deviled eggs made a zesty first bite, especially together with a Bloody Mary that was heavy on shaved horseradish.

Sizzling sisig (Filipino pig face dish), The Spotted Pig

Sizzling sisig (Filipino pig face dish), The Spotted Pig

Deviled eggs, The Spotted Pig

Deviled eggs, The Spotted Pig

Bloody Mary, The Spotted Pig

Bloody Mary, The Spotted Pig

Speaking of drinks, we came away with a few other favorite places to imbibe. My Calle Fresca margarita at the Meatpacking District location of Dos Caminos was pleasantly tropical with a punch from the ancho-salt rim (I also loved their chips and salsa). We were also seeking somewhere cozy for a glass of wine in Midtown East, and Cello Wine Bar fit the bill. Exposed brick, red-toned cushions, and lots of candles – and, of course, diverse by-the-glass options that we all enjoyed sipping.

Calle Fresca margarita with Cazadores Blanco, mango, cucumber, and ancho salt rim

Calle Fresca margarita with Cazadores Blanco, mango, cucumber, and ancho salt rim, Dos Caminos

Interior of cozy Cello Wine Bar

Interior of cozy Cello Wine Bar

The details: Russ & Daughters, 179 E. Houston St., Manhattan; Katz’s Delicatessen, 205 E. Houston St., Manhattan; Roberta’s, 261 Moore St., Brooklyn; 99-Cent Fresh Pizza, 473 Lexington Ave. (and many others), Manhattan; The Spotted Pig, 314 W. 11th St., Manhattan; Dos Caminos, 675 Hudson St., Manhattan; Cello Wine Bar, 229 E. 53rd St., Manhattan.

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Restaurant Week, Travel Eats

Travel Eats: NYC Restaurant Week recap

Travel Eats documents my food adventures outside of Chicago.

I dined on four Restaurant Week menus in as many days during a recent trip to New York. From the Financial District up to Harlem, and from Bowery over to Meatpacking, each three-course meal was distinctly delicious – here’s a round-up.

Dinner at Delmonico’s

Classic baked Alaska with walnut cake, apricot jam, banana gelato, meringue, and crème anglaise

Classic baked Alaska with walnut cake, apricot jam, banana gelato, meringue, and crème anglaise

Best Bite and other notes: Counting its earlier iterations, Delmonico’s is hailed as the oldest fine dining restaurant in the U.S., and this meal certainly had the most old-school feel, complete with mahogany-paneled walls and monogrammed china. Delmonico’s also lays claim to conceiving the classic baked Alaska dessert, which came in the form of a spiky, marshmallowy mound that encased banana gelato and almond cake. The equally delicious entree, a petit filet mignon with red wine sauce, creamy potatoes, and charred cauliflower, had the simplicity and execution you’d expect from such a storied steakhouse. See full menu.

Petit filet mignon with Delmonico potato, charred cauliflower, and cabernet wine sauce

Petit filet mignon with Delmonico potato, charred cauliflower, and cabernet wine sauce

Delmonico's classic interior

Delmonico’s classic interior, including the mural that was inspired by a 1940′s photo

The details: Delmonico’s Restaurant, 56 Beaver St., New York.

Dinner at DBGB Kitchen & Bar

Chef's selection of East Coast oysters

Chef’s selection of East Coast oysters

Best Bite and other notes: I’d never been to one of Chef Daniel Boulud’s restaurants, and was impressed not only by the food, but also the decor – especially the mirrored walls emblazoned with culinary quotations. For dinner, I happily slurped down four briny East Coast oysters with a garlicky champagne mignonette and devoured the plump duck and pork belly sausage with grainy mustard. My favorite course, though, was the playful dessert. The bourbon chocolate sundae was vanilla ice cream topped with chocolate syrup and bourbon, and then scattered with cubes of all textures – dense chocolate brownie, bourbon gelee, crispy chocolate-chip cookie – all underneath one big whipped cream cloud. It was my favorite ice cream dessert since the Choco Taco at Little Goat here in Chicago. See full menu.

Bourbon chocolate sundae

Bourbon chocolate sundae

Duck and pork belly sausage with housemade sauerkraut, glazed turnips, and fingerling potatoes

Duck and pork belly sausage with housemade sauerkraut, glazed turnips, and fingerling potatoes

The details: DBGB Kitchen & Bar, 299 Bowery, New York.

Lunch at Red Rooster

Mac & greens with smoked gouda, NY cheddar, and caramelized onions

Mac & greens with smoked gouda, NY cheddar, and caramelized onions

Best Bite and other notes: Red Rooster seemed to truly capture the spirit of Harlem, with vibrant colors and all kinds of cultural relics. I was also thrilled that Chef Marcus Samuelsson himself was at the restaurant that day, and stopped by our table to say hello! I really enjoyed all three courses: the coconut-cauliflower soup fragrant with lemongrass, the oh-so-cheesy mac ‘n’ collard greens, and the cinnamon-sugared doughnut holes with light sweet potato filling. See full menu.

Red Rooster doughnuts with sweet potato filling and cinnamon sugar

Red Rooster doughnuts with sweet potato filling and cinnamon sugar

Interior of Red Rooster

Colorful interior of Red Rooster

The details: Red Rooster, 310 Lenox Ave., Harlem.

Dinner at Spice Market

Mapo tofu with black bean sauce, Chinese long beans, and thai basil

Mapo tofu with black bean sauce, Chinese long beans, and thai basil

Best Bite and other notes: Spice Market is the Southeast Asian-influenced restaurant in Chef Jean-Georges Vongerichten’s dining empire, so it seemed like a fun, shareable pick for Restaurant Week. Ornate and dimly lit (please excuse the lighting in the photos!), the palatial space fit right into the buzzy Meatpacking District. Food-wise, the mapo tofu was the winner, with chunks of tofu, chewy rice-cake slices, and Chinese long beans lacquered in black bean sauce. There was also irresistible crunch in the grain salad – we later learned it was millet and amaranth – amidst lots of veggies and a tangy tamarind vinaigrette. See full menu.

Crispy grain salad with tamarind vinaigrette

Crispy grain salad with tamarind vinaigrette

The details: Spice Market, 403 W. 13th St., New York.

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Travel Eats

Next stop: New York City!

On a walk across the Brooklyn Bridge when I lived in New York

On a walk across the Brooklyn Bridge when I lived in New York

Just when you thought I couldn’t possibly have anything else to say about Restaurant Week – it’s time for round two. Tomorrow, I’ll be traveling to another incredible city to participate: New York! It’s part of a girls’ trip for my friend’s birthday that conveniently overlaps with NYC Restaurant Week. We won’t just be indulging in three-course meals, though, so also expect a full report of all the best bites in between. After a short time living there and a handful of trips since, I’ve decided that a few foods are mandatory whenever I’m in the Big Apple: bagel and lox, pastrami (preferably from Katz’s), pizza, and two kinds of cookies (namely, chocolate-chip from Levain and black-and-white from Lenny’s). I’m excited to try several new places this trip and taste the cuisine of chefs I’ve followed for years. Check back next week for more on my NYC adventures.

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