Travel Eats

Travel Eats: Hawaiian honeymoon dining on Kauai and Oahu

Travel Eats documents my food adventures while traveling.

Well, a lot has changed since my last post. I got engaged, took a year off from blogging to plan a wedding, and am now happily married! This also means I’ve become Hillary Weller rather than Hillary Proctor, but the blog name will remain the same for now.

We just returned from 10 days in Hawaii for our honeymoon, so that seemed a fitting return to blogging. We split our time between two Hawaiian islands: Kauai and Oahu. On Kauai, we covered the majority of the island; for Oahu, we stayed primarily in the Waikiki Beach area of Honolulu. This was my first time setting foot anywhere in the state, so I was anxious to try the source of all the Hawaiian flavors I’d enjoyed from afar.

Macadamia nut pancakes with pineapple and coconut syrup, Eggs 'n Things
Macadamia nut pancakes with pineapple and coconut syrup, Eggs ‘n Things (Honolulu)

I’ll start with my favorite dish of the trip. It was one that came highly recommended at Eggs ‘n Things, a beloved Honolulu breakfast spot: macadamia nut pancakes. The nut-studded cakes were unbelievably fluffy underneath their griddled exterior, and the addition of fresh pineapple and the restaurant’s signature coconut syrup made them truly remarkable. I loved these pancakes so much that they merited a repeat visit: we went back for our last meal before heading to the airport to fly home. That time, I ordered a slight variation (banana in the pancakes and macadamia on top) and they were still just as stellar. I also happily took home a bottle of the coconut syrup.

We had a favorite breakfast spot in Kauai, too. A lovely bakery happened to be conveniently located across the road from where we were staying, so we tried a few of their pastry selections. Both the mango muffin and the roasted pineapple croissant-scone hybrid showcased the fruit flavors of the island.

Hawaiian roasted pineapple and chocolate chip croisscones, Passion Bakery Cafe, Kauai
Hawaiian roasted pineapple and chocolate chip croisscones (enjoyed on our oceanfront lanai), Passion Bakery Cafe (Kauai)
Guava muffin, Passion Bakery Cafe, Kauai
Mango muffin, Passion Bakery Cafe (Kauai)
Pakala bowl with açai, peanut butter, strawberries, bananas, blueberries, granola, almonds, and chocolate chips, Little Fish Coffee
Pakala bowl with açai, peanut butter, strawberries, bananas, blueberries, granola, almonds, and chocolate chips, Little Fish Coffee (Kauai)

Another morning dish I’d been anxious to try was the açai bowl, a surfer favorite that’s anchored by an açai berry frozen yogurt-style base, then layered with granola and fresh fruit. At Little Fish Coffee on Kauai, our bowl boasted peanut butter and chocolate chips in addition to the fruit and granola. It was the rich fuel we needed for the rest of the day’s adventures. In Waikiki, we sought out the bowl at Island Vintage Coffee. The açai and granola were delicious, but the sweet local banana and fragrant Hawaiian honey were what really shined.

Original açai bowl with strawberry, blueberry, local banana, Big Island organic honey, and organic granola, Island Vintage Coffee (Honolulu)
Original açai bowl with strawberry, blueberry, local banana, Big Island organic honey, and organic granola, Island Vintage Coffee (Honolulu)
Pink Island shave ice with strawberry, lychee mint, vanilla gelato, fresh strawberries, mochi, lychee popping boba, and condensed milk snow cap, Island Vintage Shave Ice (Honolulu)
Pink Island shave ice with strawberry, lychee mint, vanilla gelato, fresh strawberries, mochi, lychee popping boba, and condensed milk snow cap, Island Vintage Shave Ice (Honolulu)

While we’re on the sweet side of things, let’s talk shave (not shaved!) ice, a traditional frozen treat in Hawaii with all kinds of variations. We went back to Island Vintage for their Pink Island, whose ice mound had half strawberry syrup and half super-refreshing lychee mint syrup, plus mochi, lychee boba, fresh strawberry, and condensed milk to top it off. At Uncle’s on Kauai, they served shave snow, where the creaminess and fruit flavor was already incorporated into the ice before shaving. After adding a haupia (coconut) cream top, I couldn’t help but slurp up every bite.

Strawberry shave snow with haupia (coconut) cream cap, Uncle's Shave Ice (Kauai)
Strawberry shave snow with haupia (coconut) cream cap, Uncle’s Shave Ice (Kauai)
Dole whip swirled with vanilla, Hilo Hattie (Kauai)
Dole whip swirled with vanilla, Hilo Hattie (Kauai)

To be sure, Hawaii wasn’t short on frozen treats – from classic soft-serve pineapple Dole whip to ice cream served in an adorable “hang loose” cone to a sky-high Hula Pie enjoyed along the Waikiki beachfront at Duke’s, our collective sweet tooth remained sated.

Shaka-Boom cone with vanilla soft-serve, chocolate sauce, Oreo cookie dust, and sprinkles, Kokoro Cafe
Shaka-Boom cone with vanilla soft-serve, chocolate sauce, Oreo cookie dust, and sprinkles, Kokoro Cafe (Honolulu)
Kimo's Original Hula Pie with chocolate cookie crust, macadamia nut ice cream, hot fudge, toasted mac nuts, and whipped cream, Duke's Waikiki (Honolulu
Kimo’s Original Hula Pie with chocolate cookie crust, macadamia nut ice cream, hot fudge, toasted mac nuts, and whipped cream, Duke’s Waikiki (Honolulu)

We tried a lot of savory Hawaiian favorites as well. At Lava Lava Beach Club on Kauai, we had loco moco, traditionally a burger patty with egg, rice, and gravy, and in this case with a mountain of fried onions and a delicious patty blend of beef and sweet Portuguese sausage. That meal was extra memorable because we looked up from our beachfront table and spotted a whale in the distance! Later, we also tried a classic, no-fuss plate lunch with freshly-fried chicken katsu, sticky white rice, and macaroni salad.

Hapa Laka loco moco with half beef, half Portuguese sausage, Lava Lava Beach Club
Hapa Laka loco moco with half beef, half Portuguese sausage, Lava Lava Beach Club (Kauai)
Chicken katsu plate lunch, Ai Ono Cafe at Lihue Airport
Chicken katsu plate lunch, Ai Ono Cafe at Lihue Airport (Kauai)

Our most theatrical dining experience by far was at the Smith Family Garden Luau on Kauai. Our evening began with a tram ride around the property, then we had time to explore the lush grounds on foot. Next, we witnessed the imu ceremony, in which a whole-roasted, leaf-wrapped Kalua pig is carefully removed from its earthen oven.

From there, it was time to enjoy a mai tai and the full buffet. This was my chance to try poi, a starchy Hawaiian staple that’s polarizing among visitors. Unfortunately, I had to agree with the naysayers: even when paired with the meat, the poi retained an unpleasant flavor, and its paste-like texture only made matters worse. But there were plenty of other dishes to enjoy, like the mahimahi, purple yams, lomi salmon, and of course the pig, whose smoke-kissed flavor was in a class of its own. Dinner was also accompanied by live Hawaiian music and a hula lesson.

Finally, we moved to the amphitheater for the stage show, featuring dances and rituals that represent many of Hawaii’s cultural influences (plus some impressive pyrotechnics). The whole experience was as seamless and well-choreographed as a Disney enterprise – it was undoubtedly a highlight of our trip.

Kalua roasted pig, poi, lomi salmon, sweet & sour mahimahi, macaroni salad, guava and pineapple breads, coconut rice pudding, mai tai, and more from the dinner buffet at Smith Family Garden Luau
Kalua roasted pig, poi, lomi salmon, sweet & sour mahimahi, macaroni salad, guava and pineapple breads, coconut rice pudding, mai tai, and more from the dinner buffet at Smith Family Garden Luau (Kauai)
Mixed ahi and salmon poké with spicy mayo, Shaka Poke (Honolulu)
Ahi-salmon mixed poke with avocado and spicy mayo (eaten on Waikiki Beach in view of Diamond Head), Shaka Poke (Honolulu)

Seafood was another top priority during our time in Hawaii. I had the chance to enjoy poke in two forms, one on each island. At Shaka Poke, a tucked-away gem in one of Waikiki’s shopping malls, hunks of salmon and ahi tuna came dressed in spicy mayo with seaweed and avocado. It was the ideal humble meal to eat on the beach, especially with a view of the resort skyline and Diamond Head at dusk. On Kauai, Sam’s Ocean View used tuna poke to adorn wonton chip nachos, alongside avocado, spicy aioli, and plenty of black sesame. It was the kind of snack you can’t stop eating.

The most eclectic fish I tried during the trip was moonfish at Mahina & Sun’s in Honolulu. The fish itself was dense and held up to the mixture of Mediterranean flavors in the rest of the dish – lots of fennel, olive, sumac, and lightly pickled cucumber, plus grilled flatbread to sop it all up.

Ahi poke nachos with chopped avocado, red bell pepper salsa, wasabi, and sriracha aioli over wonton chips, Sam's Ocean View
Ahi poke nachos with chopped avocado, red bell pepper salsa, wasabi, and sriracha aioli over wonton chips, Sam’s Ocean View (Kauai)
Opah (moonfish) with cucumber, fennel, suman, flatbread, and black olive tapenade, Mahina & Sun's (Honolulu)
Opah (moonfish) with cucumber, fennel, sumac, flatbread, and black olive tapenade, Mahina & Sun’s (Honolulu)
Curry udon with soft-boiled egg, Marukame Udon (Honolulu)
Curry udon with soft-boiled egg, Marukame Udon (Honolulu)

On our second night in Honolulu, we joined the throngs of people in line for Marukame Udon. The wait was very much worth it for tender, hand-pulled udon noodles in a rich curry broth. Between picking up your noodle bowl and getting to the cash register, you could select tempura items and other appetizers buffet-style, so I took that as an opportunity to try spam musubi (seared slice of spam over rice with a seaweed wrapper, like nigiri). It was easy to see why it’s such a popular Hawaiian snack.

Our last dinner of the trip was at Senia, Honolulu’s buzziest fine-dining restaurant. There was a lot to love on the menu; the ahi brioche and citrus-cured hamachi both celebrated Hawaiian flavors in a creative and beautiful way.

It was certainly a special introduction to Hawaii for me…but exploring the cuisine of the islands we didn’t visit seems like a very good excuse to return!

Ahi brioche, Senia (Honolulu)
Ahi brioche, Senia (Honolulu)
Citrus-cured hamachi with avocado, jalapeño, and wakame, Senia (Honolulu)
Citrus-cured hamachi with avocado, jalapeño, and wakame, Senia (Honolulu)

The details: Eggs ‘n Things, 339 Saratoga Rd., Honolulu; Passion Bakery Cafe, 4-356 Kuhio Hwy., Ste. 121, Kapa’a; Uncle’s Shave Ice, 4454 Nuhou St. #419, Lihue; Smith Family Garden Luau, 3-5971 Kuhio Hwy., Kapa’a; Lava Lava Beach Club, 420 Papaloa Rd., Kapa’a; Little Fish Coffee, 3900 Hanapepe Rd., Ste. D, Hanapepe; Sam’s Ocean View, 4-1546 Kuhio Hwy., Kapa’a; Hilo Hattie, 3-3252 Kuhio Hwy., Lihue; Ai Ono Cafe at Lihue Airport, 3901 Mokulele Loop, Lihue; Mahina & Sun’s, 412 Lewers St., Honolulu; Marukame Udon, 2310 Kūhiō Ave #124, Honolulu; Shaka Poke, 2250 Kalakaua Ave., Honolulu; Duke’s Waikiki, 2335 Kalakaua Ave., Ste. 116, Honolulu; Island Vintage Coffee, 2301 Kalakaua Ave. #C215, Honolulu; Senia, 75 N. King St., Honolulu; Kokoro Cafe, 2233 Kalakaua Ave., Honolulu; Island Vintage Shave Ice, 2201 Kalakaua Ave., Kiosk B-1, Honolulu (all Hawaii).

Standard

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *